Is Suicide really “self killing”?


written by Shreya at in category Thoughts with 0 Comments


Is Suicide really “self killing”?

‘I think suicide is sort of like cancer was 50 years ago. People don't want to talk about it; they don't want to know about it. People are frightened of it, and they don't understand, when actually these issues are medically treatable; -Judy Collins
 

‘ are unke ladke ne suicide kr liya, bichara padai ka pressure’ ‘ohhoo kaam ka pressure, bichari rita her husband attempted suicide’

These are very common phrase that we hear when someone commits a suicide, we show our outmost sympathy to the family members. Then we would blame the system, then would blame something else, and get over it in few days. Suicide had always been the talk of the town; we know it is the serious issue. Suicide is not a death, it’s a signal, and it’s a finger that points towards how depressing we have made our lives.

In this world, about 800000 commit suicide every year and out of these 135000 are residents of India (shocking! no I don’t think so). Between 1987 and 2007, the suicide rate increased from 7.9 to 10.3 per 100,000, with higher suicide rates in southern and eastern states of India. In 2012, Tamil Nadu (12.5% of all suicides), Maharashtra (11.9%) and West Bengal (11.0%) had the highest proportion of suicides. Among large population states, Tamil Nadu and Kerala had the highest suicide rates per 100,000 people in 2012. The male to female suicide ratio has been about 2:1. Estimates for number of suicides in India vary.

According to WHO data, the age standardized suicide rate in India is 16.4 per 100,000 for women (6th highest in the world) and 25.8 for men (ranking 22nd). In India, about 46,000 suicides occurred each in 15–29 and 30–44 age groups in 2012 – or about 34% each of all suicides. Suicide rates in India are climbing faster than in the rest of the world with Indian women having some of the highest rates on the planet. India alone accounts for approximately 30 percent of the world’s suicide deaths. In 2013, suicide claimed the lives of more than a quarter of a million Indians. That’s five times greater than all global deaths due to war and natural disasters combined.

 

The main issues or the major causes for suicide is that we don’t seem to talk much to the victim, not much with the person who is suffering from it. We seem to outcast the person who has depression, we will keep him out of our talks and just shoo them away saying he/she needs a mental doctor. But we fail to realize the fact that as family and friends we need to be more supportive for these people. We need to talk to out. Any kind of sudden calmness, or anxiety or different behavior, or personality disorder can be taken as a trait for suicidal tendency.

We tend to put a lot of pressure on our kids for our prestige in the society but we tend to forgive that if we lose the kid then there won’t be any fame. There are many factors that encourage the abetment of suicide. Like why should we punish the victim, it is really the fault of the victim, aren’t they already punished? They have n number of thoughts in going on in their mind. They believe the fact that they are no good for the people, they have disappointed the important people in their life and they are failure.

Although there is no miracle cure for suicide in India, stronger surveillance and a deeper understanding of what’s driving so many people to kill themselves is crucial for developing programs and policies to prevent suicide. Such intervention improvements will need to be sensitive to India’s unique cultural and socioeconomic position in order to address specific barriers such as economic instability, women’s rigid gender roles, and mental health stigmatization. Without such advances, India’s high suicide rates will only continue to rise.

We are in this together, we need to fight this.

BE THE CHANGE TO SEE THE CHANGE.

 

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